Adult Full Service Partnerships (FSP) Data

Adult and Older Adult Full Service Partnerships

Full Service Partnerships (FSP) are programs designed and implemented in order to assist the target population in achieving high levels of recovery through following evidence based and best practices. FSPs provide culturally competent services that include case management, benefits acquisition, crisis response, intervention and stabilization, medication evaluation and supports, and effective ongoing mental health services. These programs also provide a full array of recovery support services to include but not limited to housing, employment, education, peer support, and transportation.

Progress Reports

2010

Adult FSP Programs-April 30, 2010

The information contained in the graphs is from data that was current on April 30, 2010. The data is from members' previous 12 months prior to enrolling into the program and their information after enrollment. The majority of graphs in this report, with the exception of Graph A and B, compare members' pre-enrollment data with their post-enrollment data.

There will always be members with different tenure in the program. To account for this the post data is annualized to make the different tenures comparable to the 12-months prior to enrollment. The numbers reported are not true values, but this method has been found to be the best way to depict how the program is currently performing. For this current data set, the average tenure was a little more than one and a half years.

With this data, Adult Mental Health Services (AMHS) is able to give the community, programs, and members a picture of how programs are accomplishing their goals. If used properly, this information can be a catalyst for change and the start to a conversation about a program's strengths and other areas that can be built up and fortified. The Full Service Partnerships (FSPs) in Orange County are encouraged to take a proactive approach to the work they accomplish by using and learning from their data.

Below are a few of the main indicators that AMHS uses to monitor a program's performance. This is by no means the limit of what can be looked at and what can be accomplished through analyzing and utilizing data and outcome measures.

The Adult Full Service Partnerships (FSPs) are comprised of three programs. The FSPs aim to reduce homelessness, incarceration, and psychiatric hospitalizations while also increasing levels of education and employment. The Mental Health Association (MHA) has one program with two tracks - Choices and Whatever It Takes Court (WIT Court). WIT Court focuses on members who take part in the collaborative court program. College Community Services operates Opportunity Knocks which focuses on members with a high level of recidivism within the correctional mental health system. Telecare is the largest FSP with 220 slots.

The majority of the members that are served are Caucasian. Approximately one third of members identify as Hispanic, African American, or Asian American. The remaining members are comprised of Native Americans, Pacific Islanders and other ethnicities. This distribution of ethnicities is near the overall ethnic distribution in Orange County.

Performance indicators are a set of measurements that are chosen to track the progress of a program and how successful they are in these areas. The Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) requires that FSPs be held accountable for producing changes in members' lives in the areas of psychiatric hospitalizations, incarcerations, homelessness, employment, and education.

These indicators are based on members' pre-enrollment and post-enrollment data. Psychiatric Hospitalizations were reduced by 50%, Incarcerations reduced by 88% and Homelessness reduced by 70%.

Members in the FSPs have spent 17% more time employed since being enrolled. Education has increased 48% and is measured in the number of members as opposed to days.

Days spent hospitalized have dropped by 50%. Looking through the lens of recovery, it is important to remember that each person goes through an individualized process of recovery and that sometimes people move backward before they can move forward.

The actual post enrollment days were 6,520. The reason that the annualized data is lower is that multiple members have been in the program for more than three years and have three years worth of hospitalizations.

The levels of incarceration have dropped significantly, currently being reduced by 88%. A large reason why the FSPs are so successful is the ability to respond to crisis situations on a 24/7 basis. Some individuals who do not yet have an adequate support structure would have previously relied on law enforcement to help them with their crisis, often ending in a person being incarcerated.

The actual post enrollment days were 4,340. The reason that the annualized data is lower is that multiple members have been in the program for more than three years and have three years worth of incarcerations.

The number of homeless days has dropped by 70%. It is important to note that the number of homeless days includes living in a shelter and/or temporary housing. Although people in these situations do have a place to sleep, they do not have a place to live. It is the hope of the FSPs to enable everyone they serve to have a place to call home.

The actual post enrollment days were 32,067. The reason that the annualized data is lower is that multiple members have been in the program for more than three years and have three years worth of homelessness.

The number of days employed has increased by 17%. This increase reflects the focus of the FSPs of finding employment for their members. Although large majorities of members enrolled in the FSPs do not have employment, a recent survey of members showed that they plan and desire to become employed.

The actual post enrollment days were 32,803. The reason that the annualized data is lower is that multiple members have been in the program for more than three years and have three years worth of employment history. You can see the same effect in Graph H. The reverse effect can be found in graphs D, E, and F.

The number of members who are enrolled in school are measured as opposed to the number of days. The reason for this being that the number of days is not always accurate with the accumulation of weekends and summers off. Currently, FSPs are experiencing a 48% rise in the number of members enrolled in some form of education.

The actual post enrollment days were 126. The reason that the annualized data is higher is that multiple members have been in the program for more than three years and have three years worth of educational history.


For Adult & Older Adult MHSA Programs and Data information you may contact:

FSPData@ochca.com
or
Annette Mugrditchian, LCSW
Division Manager, Adult & Older Adult Programs
at amugrditchian@ochca.com
or
Anthony Delgado, LCSW
Program Manager II, Adult & Older Adult MHSA FSP Programs
at adelgado@ochca.com